Category Archives: Conferences and meetings

Call for Papers: Engendering Near Eastern Archaeology

Call for Papers: Engendering Near Eastern Archaeology
(Theme/section at 11ICAANE, Munich 3 -7 April, 2018)

http://www.icaane2018.vorderas-archaeologie.uni-muenchen.de/programme/sections/index.html

Gender roles and identities are fundamental for the construction of most sociocultural norms and practices, ancient and modern. The Ancient Near East offers ample evidence to explore how these were enacted and materialized in political, economic, religious, and private spheres.

This section welcomes contributions that use gender as a category of analysis when dealing with various kinds of archaeological, bioarchaeological, visual and textual sources. Contributors are encouraged to clarify their theoretical and methodological stance when addressing issues such as gender and power relations, gender-specific treatments of bodies, the role of artistic media in the propagation of gender ‘ideals’, or the use of objects for engendering all kinds of cultural practices.

Deadline by July 31, 2017. Further details on submission guidelines and registration, on 11ICAANE website.
http://www.icaane2018.vorderas-archaeologie.uni-muenchen.de/index.html

Report on the “Second Workshop on Gender, Methodology and the Ancient Near East”

The “Second Workshop on Gender, Methodology and the Ancient Near East”1 took place in Barcelona February 1-3, 2017. The workshop was hosted by IPOA, the Institute of Ancient Near Eastern Studies of the University of Barcelona (Spain), and organized in cooperation with the Centre of Excellence in “Changes in Sacred Texts and Traditions” (University of Helsinki, Finland). Organizers were Agnès Garcia-Ventura (IPOA, University of Barcelona) and Saana Svärd (University of Helsinki). The workshop was a continuation of the “First Workshop on Gender, Methodology and the Ancient Near East.” The first workshop was organized by the same two scholars at the University of Helsinki in October 2014 and hosted by the Centre of Excellence in “Changes in Sacred Texts and Traditions.”

gender BCN 2017_group photo

The aim of both meetings was to discuss different methodological and theoretical approaches to gender within the framework of ancient Near Eastern studies (including archaeology, art history and text studies) and to enable fruitful dialogue between these approaches. Moreover, for this second workshop, colleagues from neighboring disciplines were also encouraged to submit proposals, in order to enrich these conversations further. As a result, the second workshop included colleagues from the disciplines of Assyriology, Archaeology, Egyptology, Phoenician and Punic studies, and Biblical studies (See the full program: http://www.ub.edu/ipoa/Gender_bcn.pdf). Continue reading Report on the “Second Workshop on Gender, Methodology and the Ancient Near East”

Call of papers (ASOR): Gender in the Ancient Near East

ASORSession Chairs: Stephanie Langin-Hooper, Southern Methodist University.

Description: Session explores the interface between gender and archaeology, and the ways in which archaeology and related disciplines can reconstruct the world of women and other gender groups in antiquity. Papers should explore subjects such as the household and domestic life, industry and commerce, religion, etc. Other topics may also be included.

Deadline by February the 15th. Further details on submission guidelines and registration, on ASOR website.

Second Workshop on Gender, Methodology and the Ancient Near

Second Workshop on Gender, Methodology and the Ancient Near East Universitat de Barcelona, February 1-3, 20171

Hosts: IPOA, Universitat de Barcelona and Centre of Excellence “Sacred Texts in Change” in the University of Helsinki

Conference venue: Universitat de Barcelona – Edifici Josep Carner (pl. Universitat, access through Aribau street, number 2), room 0.1 (ground floor). Nearest metro station: Universitat (lines 1 and 2) — Plaça de la Universitat – Google Maps

Organizers: Agnès Garcia-Ventura (IPOA, Universitat de Barcelona) / Saana Svärd (University of Helsinki)

Wednesday February 1st 2017

8.45-9.00: registration
9.00-9.45: welcome and introduction

9.00-9.15: Welcome: Adelina Millet Albà, director of the IPOA
9.15-9.45: Presentation and introduction to the workshop: Agnès Garcia-Ventura & Saana Svärd, “Studying Gender in the Ancient Near East: An Introduction”

9.45-11.15: panel 1

9.45-10.15: Ann Guinan, “Dressing the Whore of Babylon for the 21st Century: Sex, Gender and Theory in Mesopotamian Studies”
10.15-10.45: Gioele Zisa, “Queering šà-zi.ga Therapy. Considerations on the Relations between Masculinity, Sickness and Anatomy” Continue reading Second Workshop on Gender, Methodology and the Ancient Near

Call for papers: “Second Workshop on Gender, Methodology and the Ancient Near East”

Organisers: Agnès Garcia-Ventura (“Sapienza”, Università degli Studi di Roma / IPOA, Universitat de Barcelona) & Saana Svärd (University of Helsinki)

When and where: IPOA, Universitat de Barcelona (Spain), February 1-3 2017.

Hosts:

After the workshop held in Helsinki in October 20141, the organisers are now pleased to announce the “Second Workshop on Gender, Methodology, and the Ancient Near East”. The aim of the meeting is to discuss different methodological and theoretical approaches to gender within the framework of ancient Near Eastern studies (including archaeology, art history and text studies) and to enable fruitful dialogues between these approaches.

If you are interested in delivering a paper relating to the aims of the workshop, please send us the title and the abstract (150-300 words) by September 30th: Agnès Garcia-Ventura (agnes.ventura[AT]gmail.com) and Saana Svärd (saana.svard[AT]helsinki.fi). Decisions about acceptance will be made before October 15th.

Hierarchy and Equality – Representations of Sex/Gender in the Ancient World

Time and place:
Sep 11, 2016 – Sep 13, 2016, The Norwegian Institute at Athens, Greece

The Norwegian Institute in Athens, in collaboration with the Centre for Gender Research at the University of Oslo, would like to announce the call for papers for the interdisiplinary conference «Hierarchy and Equality – Representations of Sex/Gender in the Ancient World». We invite scholars with a material and/or theoretical interest in sex/gender, or in social structures based on gender distinctions. We hope to explore more broadly what was “before sex”, i.e. the modern reproduction-based two-sex model (Laqueur), and seek possibly even more fruitful ways to approach sex/gender in the ancient world. We encourage contributors to approach a variety of records and explore hypotheses outside of the established scholarly consensus on ancient understandings of sex/gender. We also encourage papers that reflect on the extent to which modern notions of sex/gender affect our reading of the past.
Continue reading Hierarchy and Equality – Representations of Sex/Gender in the Ancient World

Masculinities and the Ancient Near East

Masculinities studies is an interdisciplinary field that seeks to analyse how being or becoming a man was constructed, performed and represented in specific social contexts, both modern as well as ancient. Although it is far easier to study masculinities in modern periods –due, no less, to the fact that we have not only manuals detailing how to perform gender in accordance with societal norms, but also to the fact that we can interview people about what it means to them to be or become masculine-we cannot have this type of access to ancient man. Nevertheless, in the absence of direct documentation or manuals that describe how society expected men to behave, we have to turn to other sources, like the Bible and the annalistic inscriptions and palace relief programmes of Mesopotamian kings, to study how masculinities were constructed in ancient history.

In this talk, I will first be discussing what we mean by the social construction of masculinities, and then look at individual case studies based on our ancient source material to show that masculinity has never only been an essential, monolithic and stable substance conferred by nature through male hormones, but rather the continuous process of gender configuration and reconfiguration that not only makes masculinity differ across time and space, but an aspect of identity that may change even thorough the course of a man’s (or, indeed, a woman’s) lifetime. Continue reading Masculinities and the Ancient Near East